A Guide to First Person from Reedsy

12 Mar

I adore writing and reading in the first person. Escaping into a character’s mind in first person carries me away into fictional worlds. I help a lot of my editing clients navigate writing first person, or decide whether to write in first or third person. Reedsy, a database of freelance editors, designers, and other publishing experts, published some of my thoughts on the matter, along with other great advice on writing in first person.

Read the whole post about writing in the first person here.

Free Course on Dialogue Mechanics

6 Feb Dialogue Mechanics: A Reedsy Learning Course

Over the years, I have searched far and wide for a comprehensive resource that covers basic and advanced dialogue mechanics all in one place. When do you use periods versus commas? When do you start a new paragraph? What if someone interrupts someone else?

While there are certainly conventions for these situations, they’re not comprehensively covered in typical grammar books and resources.

Thus, I was very excited to draw together many different resources and create a course on dialogue punctuation, paragraphing, and more. Best of all, it is available for free via Reedsy Learning.

You can sign up for this course on dialogue mechanics here. Once you sign up, you will receive a ~750-word email each day for 10 days. Each email covers different elements of dialogue mechanics. If you don’t see the emails, try searching your inbox for “learning@reedsy.com,” as sometimes automated emails are filtered in strange ways.

I know mechanics issues sometimes make writers snore, but I had a lot of fun writing these lessons. Plus, I got to use examples from some of my favorite writers: Rachel Lynn Solomon, Courtney Summers, and Diana Gabaldon. To no one’s surprise, most of the examples I made up are about dogs.

I hope you find the course helpful! Let me know if you have any geeky dialogue questions after taking it.

Seeking Writing and Editing Work: Back From Maternity Leave

20 Aug

Tracy Gold with her daughter

I am excited to finally relaunch my writing and editing career after a rough pregnancy and some major post-partum health complications. After struggling with hyperemesis gravidarum (yup, like Duchess Kate), and complications from surgery to remove my gallbladder, I am now looking forward to fewer hospital visits and more engaging work. (Snuggles with my adorable daughter are a given!)

Here is the kind of work I am most excited to dive back into:

  • Editing creative writing (fiction and non-fiction)
  • Editing business/marketing writing
  • Writing marketing content

Check out my services page for a full list of what I can help with, as well as testimonials from some of my past clients. You can read more about my qualifications in my bio, and contact me at tracycgold@gmail.com. If you’re just here for baby pictures (or horses and dogs), check out my Instagram.

Homefront Cooking: Essay and Recipe

5 Jun

I’m very excited about Homefront Cooking, a collection of recipes and essays from military service memories and their families. I contributed a brief essay about my Grandpa Charlie and Grandma Lil, along with Lil’s delicious mashed potato recipe.

Homefront Cooking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more about Homefront Cooking in the New York Post.

You can buy Homefront Cooking here.

Welcome, Ava Goldwray

5 Jun

I’m thrilled to update this blog with some happy news! My daughter, Ava Goldwray, was born on March 14th, 2018. I have accordingly been on hiatus from the writing and editing world. Thanks to a gall bladder attack and pending surgery, I will unfortunately be taking the back seat a little bit longer. I will shout it to the rooftops when I am back in full swing! In the meantime, here is Ava, being adorable.

Ava Goldwray

Ava GoldwrayAva Goldwray

2017 Pitch Wars Potential Mentee Bio: TURNED AWAY

24 Jul

I somewhat can’t believe that I am writing one of these again, but here I am: entering Pitch Wars with a shiny new YA manuscript for the third year in a row! I was a Pitch Wars mentee in 2015, chosen by the awesome Rachel Lynn Solomon, and in 2016, chosen by the awesome Diana Gallagher.

Why am I entering again if I was lucky enough to be chosen twice before, you may ask? Maybe I am tempting fate by seeking ANOTHER mentor as amazing as the first two, or fellow mentees as supportive, wonderful, and generally life-affirming as my friends from 2015 and 2016. Maybe I am a glutton, hoping for more of a good thing. Certainly, I love deadlines, structure, and constructive criticism. I’ll need a lot of help with this year’s book, as I’ve never written a full-length historical novel before, and whew, that’s tricky. Also, I’ve learned enough about this industry to know that the writers who succeed fight for every opportunity, even if it means their hearts could be broken by rejection. I’m not going to let this opportunity pass me by. Besides, I have a lot to give back to the Pitch Wars community, and would love to provide counsel and comfort to a new group of fellow mentees with my perspective from past years.

So here I am. Still unagented, though not for lack of hustle and revision. Still fighting. Ready to teach my battle techniques to the writers fighting alongside me, striking down the foes of rejection and self-doubt.

Continue reading 

Advice on Handling Literary Agent Revise and Resubmits

9 Jun

What to do when an agent says--I'd love to see this again if you revise-
Today I have a guest post on Adventures in YA Publishing about how to approach a revise-and-resubmit request from an agent. The idea from this blog post came from a question a writer asked me on Twitter. If you have a question that would make a good blog post, feel free to comment here or contact me!

What Pitch Wars Mentees Want in a Mentor

5 Jun

Love Letters to Pitch Wars MentorsPitch Wars is coming up again, and mentors are preparing their wishlists! When I tweeted about having time to write a blog post, I was asked to consider what a Pitch Wars mentee wants in a mentor. As a two-time mentee who’s had AMAZING mentors, I know a little something about that.

I’ll share my experience, and then include some comments from other Pitch Wars mentees below.

Both years that I have participated in Pitch Wars, I had a very hard time narrowing down my list of mentors. For those new to the contest, there are generally dozens of mentors for each age category, and mentees choose 4-6 mentors to submit a query and first chapter to. Those mentors then ask for full manuscripts if they are intrigued, and choose which mentee they would like to work with.

Both years, there were so many amazing mentors I thought I could learn from, who talked about books like mine on their wishlists, and who were fun to interact with on Twitter. I pored over mentors’ wishlists, analyzed their past mentees, read their blogs and books, and compared mentor picks with other hopeful mentees. Ultimately, I went with my gut, and both years, I chose well. I was picked as a mentee by Rachel Lynn Solomon in 2015 and Diana Gallagher in 2016. I still talk to both of my mentors regularly, and my life is so much richer because they are in it (cheesy but so true!).

Continue reading 

Book a Query Critique at a Steep Discount for a Limited Time

17 May

I’m offering a steep query critique discount to kick off my summer of aggressively growing my editing business. I posted about this over on my company Sounding Sea’s website, and I am reposting here.

Are you getting ready to send a book out to literary agents, or wondering if you could improve a query you’re currently sending? Getting your query professionally critiqued can help your novel jump out of the slush pile.

I am excited to offer a 50% query critique discount until June 15th, or until my schedule totally fills up, whichever comes first. Book your critique quickly! My query critiques involve two rounds of feedback and any necessary email back and forth between rounds. That means you get two rounds of feedback on your query for only $50, while many query critiques cost over $100 and only include one round of feedback. I also generally turn around query critiques within a few business days, or a week maximum, while other services often require waiting for months.

When I critique queries, I focus on helping the author communicate their vision for the book. In the first round, I’ll ask questions and provide feedback about the big picture of your query: does your vision for the book come across in a clear and compelling way? I’ll then send you off to make changes. In the second round, I’ll dive in with a laser focus to help you polish your new and improved query to a shine. With this process, you can be sure that you’ve nailed the revisions of your query and can be confident in the query you’re sending to agents.

You can read some of my past query critiques to get a sense of my style by clicking the links below. Note that I will not be publicly posting this round of discounted critiques. I will use the comments and track changes feature either on Word or Google Docs, whichever you prefer, not the bold and bracket system I used for the public posts.

Historical Fiction by Carly Heath, now represented by Jessie Devine at D4EO.

YA Fantasy Dual POV by Ally Overy, now represented by Natascha Morris at BookEnds Literary

YA Thriller by Suja Sukumar

Contact me at tracygold@soundingsea.com to reserve your spot before I’m all booked up!

Advice for Writing a Memoir

28 Apr

Writing a memoir can be incredibly fulfilling for you and for readers, but it can also be overwhelming. Where do you start? How long is a memoir, anyway? What should the writing style be like? What if you can’t remember all the details?

Recently, I’ve been coaching a few memoirists who want to tell their stories, but don’t know how to start. In this post, I’ll break down some of the common advice I share with them.

  Continue reading